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“All But Blind” by Walter De La Mare

20 Feb

All But Blind

by Walter De La Mare

All but blind
In his cambered hole
Gropes for worms
The four-clawed Mole.

All but blind
In the evening sky
The hooded Bat
Twirls softly by.

All but blind
In the burning day
The Barn-Owl blunders
On her way.

And blind as are
These three to me,
So blind to someone
I must be.

So this poem actually registered three things in my head, or rather, three animals.

I imagined those three animals: the Mole, the Bat, and the Owl, and I also imagined a blind old man.

I also imagined them doing their respective ‘blind’ actions which are: ‘grope’, ‘twirl’, and ‘blunder’.

Here are some visualizations:

The Mole

There he is groping the soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bat/s

I also imagined them making that distinct screeching noise as they twirl around the sky.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Barn Owl

Just one thing before the picture: please correct me if my owl picture is wrong because I’m beginning to doubt myself.

Is the Barn Owl really blind? I mean like, it has eyes...?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blind Old Man

I pictured him to look somewhat like this...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For me, this poem emphasizes on the blindness of the three animals, and how they are still able to live their lives even with the disability.

There was also a bit of a tone of revelation. I think that he wanted to tell us about “blindness towards people”.

It was also rather direct.

 

Source:

poetry.literaturelearning.org. All But Blind by Walter de la Mare. Retrieved on February 20, 2011, from: http://poetry.literaturelearning.org/?q=node/23

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3 Comments

Posted by on February 20, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

3 responses to ““All But Blind” by Walter De La Mare

  1. Thomas Thurman

    March 15, 2012 at 7:35 am

    All the animals here have eyes of some sort! But de la Mare says that the owl is blind “in the burning day”: she can only see well at night.

    In the original text the word “someone” in the final stanza has a capital letter: the poet is comparing his understanding of the animals’ relative blindness with God’s understanding of humans’ relative blindness.

     
  2. malika

    April 8, 2012 at 8:10 am

    good

     
  3. seo dallas tx

    August 2, 2013 at 1:11 pm

    I have read so many articles about the blogger lovers except this article is
    in fact a good post, keep it up.

     

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